Early Summer

/Early Summer
  • Tiarella 'Sugar and Spice' Tiarella 'Sugar and Spice'

    Potsize - 1L

    Deeply incised palmate leaves with the 'fingers' cut 3/4 of the way to the palm. All sections are strongly marked giving the whole leaf the suggestion of a purple black star with green margins. Colouring is Apple green on the young leaves, becoming dark green and textured with age. Flowers typical, little white stars with long exerted anthers tipped with orange pollen. The stems are suffused with rosy purple which pervades the buds giving the top of the pyramidal spike a warm glow.
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over

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  • Potsize - 1L

    (Geranium bergianum). Delicate, deeply divided foliage spreads well to make a fine mat well above which are held abundant blooms. The flowers are mid purple, with red veins. They are a less suacer shaped than Kashmir White with more space between each petal. This variety is also a more spreading variety than its sibling 'Kashmir White'. 45cm. Both of these two cultivars came from Kashmir (unlike 'Kashmir Pink') and were brought to the attention of Peter Yeo in 1968 by Mr Jan Stephens. Kashmir White came as G.rectum and Kashmir Purple as G.bergerianum. They were both entered into the 1970's Wisley trial as forms of G.pratense. They were both later reclassified as forms of the species G.clarkei, named after a former President of the Linnaean Society and Superintendent of the Calcutta Botanic Gardens. Graham Stuart Thomas provided the cultivar names.

    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over

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    Geranium in the Garden

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  • Geranium wallichianum 'Sylvia's Surprise' Geranium wallichianum 'Sylvia's Surprise'

    Potsize - 1L

    This is a seedling of Geranium wallichianum 'Buxton's Variety' which was discovered by Sylvia Morrow in her garden. Like its parent it has nicely rounded flowers with a slightly paler centre, flowering sporadically through the Summer and increasing as the days cool into Autumn. At this time the flowers can be accompanied by excellent red leaves. The cultivar registration notes that it can be most compared to Rozanne in form, differing chiefly in the flower colour being Pink rather than blue.. It is vigorous, upright and spreading in its growth and very floriferous.
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over

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    Geranium in the Garden

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  • Rheum palmatum var tanguticum Rheum palmatum var tanguticum

    Potsize - 1L

    Rheum palmatum var tanguticum (Polygonaceae) A most dramatic plant with huge rhubarb leaves that unfurl maroon, fading mid green. This is a particularly robust form of R.palmatum with possibly even bigger, more deeply lobed leaves. Whilst the coloured young leaves are not as dramatic as the form 'Atrosanguineum', they do continue to appear well into the season. The flowers are creamy white in a large stiffy btranched spik,  7 plus feet high. Best grown in a damp site where the roots can find water.

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    Bold Foliage Plants

  • Mecanopsis cambrica Mecanopsis cambrica var. aurantiaca

    Potsize - 1L

    Mecanopsis cambrica is the only British representative of this mainly Himalayan branch of the poppies. Mecanopsis cambrica var. aurantiaca is the orange coloured form of this plant with soft apricot coloured crepe paper poppies nodding over lush pale green foliage. Not a plant to place in the herbaceous border, instead one to allow to settle itself in amongst ferns or any informal planting of shade lovers. It is happiest in moist to damp conditions where it will seed about freely. 30cm. Mecanopsis is one of the few Genera that do all 3 primary colours with aplomb. M. cambrica is bright yellow, M. paniculata is clear blue and M.punicea is as red as they come. All strong clear colours - quite unique.
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over
  • Campanula persicifolia ‘Cornish Mist’ Campanula persicifolia 'Cornish Mist'
    Bee Friendly

    Bee Friendly

    Potsize - 1L

    Like a large version of a harebell Dense clumps of foliage and a succession  of open blue bells on tall stalks. Cornish Mist is distinguished by flowers that are paler than the type, being a subtle powder blue. Height 80cm Excellent cut flower. Good on chalk and performs well in shade.
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over

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  • Omphalodes verna ‘Alba’ Omphalodes verna 'Alba'

    Potsize - 1L

    This is the pure white form of Blue Eyed Mary. Much more of a creeper than its cousin, cappadocica and earlier to start flowering in the year. Omphalodes verna 'Alba' will spread quite freely in any cool leafy soil that is not too wet producing a wide mat of rich green foliage dotted here and there withpur white flowers. Very good to bring a sparkle of white into a dark corner. A lovely creeping species form Eastern Europe. Grows best in bright shade in humus rich soil, but relatively adaptable.
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over

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  • Omphalodes verna Omphalodes verna - Blue Eyed Mary

    Potsize - 1L

    Blue Eyed Mary. Much more of a creeper than its cousin, cappadocica and earlier to start flowering in the year. Omphalodes verna will spread quite freely in any cool leafy soil that is not too wet producing a wide mat of rich green foliage dotted here and there with intensely blue flowers. Longer in flower than cappadocica but not as showy at any one time. A lovely creeping species form Eastern Europe. Grows best in bright shade in humus rich soil, but relatively adaptable.
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over

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  • RHS AGM

    RHS AGM

    Potsize - 1L

    The perfect plant for edging a path or covering the ground in a difficult dry spot. London Pride produces smothering mats of pale green rosettes which carry airy red flower stems of small pale pink flowers in May and June. You can always tell an old favourite Cottage Garden plant by the number of common names it goes by. Try some of these for size and then pick your favourite. London Pride, Lady's Pride, St. Patrick's cabbage, Whimsey, Prattling Parnell, and Look Up And Kiss Me. Easy and rewarding.
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over
  • Geranium clarkei ‘Kashmir White’ Geranium clarkei ‘Kashmir White’

    Potsize - 1L

    (Geranium pratense 'Kashmir White', Geranium rectum 'Album'). Delicate, deeply divided foliage spreads well to make a fine mat well above which are held abundant saucer blooms. The flowers are purest white with lilac-pink veins and a pinkish eye, all set of by the small red flash of the bracts and bud bases. This is a less spreading variety than its sibling 'Kashmir Purple'. 45cm. Bothe of these two cultivars came from Kashmir (unlike 'Kashmir Pink') and were brought to the attention of Peter Yeo in 1968 by Mr Jan Stephens. Kashmir White came as G.rectum and Kashmir Purple as G.bergerianum. They were both entered into the 1970's Wisley trial as forms of G.pratense. They were both later reclassified as forms of the species G.clarkei, named after a former President of the Linnaean Society and Superintendent of the Calcutta Botanic Gardens. Graham Stuart Thomas provided the cultivar names.
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over

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    Geranium Compared

    Geranium in the Garden

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  • Acanthus spinosus Acanthus spinosus

    Potsize - 1L

    (Acanthus caroli-alexandri) . Handsome plants with large shining ornamental foliage. This species has deeply divided glossy dark green leaves. Spires of hooded foxglove-like flowers in a two-toned purple and white. Height 4-5 feet. The foliage of Acanthus spinosus represents a midpoint between the less divided of Acanthus mollis and the extreme of spikiness, Acanthus spinosus Spinossissimus Group.

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  • Nepeta racemosa 'Felix' Nepeta racemosa RCB AM-3

    Potsize - 1L

    This fairly recent introduction has at least three things to recommend it. To start with the flowers are a much richer shade of mauve than the usually found catmint and this plant has gained a reputation for being even freer in its reblooming also. The growth is a little more compact than normal as well, up to 30cm tall and twice as much wide. An ideal plant for edging along paths or beds.
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over

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    Nepeta Compared

    Catmint in the Garden

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  • Zantedeschia ‘Kiwi Blush’ Zantedeschia ‘Kiwi Blush’

    Potsize - 1L

    This is a relatively new cultivar which has come from New Zealand. The flowers are more upward facing than the standard Zantedeschia, slightly shorter and posses a lovely carmine glow to the base. In shape they tend more towards a Calla lily, more funnel shaped with less of a broad flare. Reports are that it is as hardy as Green Goddess, which we have had outside for many years, and that it will take a little more dryness than usual. Like all Zantedeschis it is best to cover younger plants with a generous mulch until they are well established. 60cm
  • Polygonatum odoratum 'Flore-Pleno' Polygonatum odoratum 'Flore-Pleno'
    Good for Bees

    Good for Bees

    Potsize - 1L

    The flowers on this variety are absolutely stuffed with extra petals such that the mouth of each little bell-like flower is completely filled up. The petals are green with a white rim. For me, it's more of a curiosity than a startling beauty, but it had its charm all the same. A little shorter than the other Solomon's Seals. The leaves are all swept back dramatically from the stems in such a way that it always puts me in mind of the Spirit of Ecstasy, the figurine on the bonnet of a Rolls Royce.
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over

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  • Amsonia tabernaemontana Amsonia tabernaemontana

    Potsize - 1L

    A long-lived sun-loving perennial which produces a stout rootstock from which it sends up a mass of willowy stems which are sheathed in narrow, fresh green leathery leaves. These are topped off in June and July with a fountain of pale, steel-blue 5-petalled stars, reminiscent of a periwinkle and opening from long French navy buds. Slow growing at first but tough and reliable and long lived The foliage can often take on lovely buttery tones in Autumn. Sun or Partial Shade. Early to Mid Summer. A native of the South East of the United States but also tolerant of the bone-chilling Winters of the Northern United States. Good for Butterflies and fairly Deer proof.
  • Potsize - 1L

    This variety has its roots firmly in Thalictrum aquilegifolium and so has broad heads like lavender-pink fluffy clouds which are quite strong in colour and set strikingly on black stems. Plant it in a sunny spot but make sure it doesn't want for water in the growing season. 1.5m plus
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over

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  • Geranium himalayense ‘Derrick Cook’ Geranium himalayense ‘Derrick Cook’

    Potsize - 1L

    Large, circular, pure white flowers (4.5cm, 2in). That is the petal overlap to give a bold effect with pleasantly undulating edges. The centres are pale, the anthers inconspicuous, but the many bee lines are picked out in deep papal purple creating the ghost of blush centre. The outer third remains pure white. A lovely thing, a bit like G.'Kashmir White' on steroids. Collected by Derrick Cook in 1984 in Narang province, Nepal. 30-45cm. Mature leaves are very large. Introduced by National collection holder Andrew Norton.

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  • Iris variegata Iris variegata
    RHS AGM

    RHS AGM

    Potsize - 9cm

    Iris hugarica. Although this little Iris is not very often found nowadays it has had a very long history of cultivation and a huge influence on modern Irises. The variegation referred to in the name refers not to the leaves, but to the flowers which are a striking mix of bright canary yellow standards and falls that are white, striped in deepest burgundy. The reason this Iris has been so influential is that it , along with Iris pallida, was the original parent of all of the tall bearded Iris grown today. These two Iris cross in their natural habitat and it was from these two that the earliest breeders started in the period between 1800 and 1850. This is a fact that was only worked out much later by William Ricartson Dykes. Best grown in sun and well drained soil but will tolerate some shade. In the wild it grows on stony hillsides and woods.

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    Iris Awards - complete overview.

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  • Convallaria majalis 'Prolificans' Convallaria majalis 'Prolificans'

    Potsize - 1L

    There are two ways in which this variety differs from the other Lily-of-the-Valley. Firstly the flower stalks can branch a little to give more flowers to the stem and secondly the flowers themselves are broader and double so that they create a fuller effect. All together a lot more 'bang for your buck' than the species, but possibly at the expense of some of the simple elegant charm. Later into flower than most of the rest as well so useful to extend the season.
    Discount of 25p per plant for quantities of 3 or over

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    Lily-of-the-Valley - Botanical Style Photographs

  • Astrantia Gill Richardson Group Astrantia Gill Richardson Group pale seedling

    Potsize - 1L

    Hatties Pincushion, Masterwort. A beautiful crimson Astrantia with very dark tips to the flower bracts surrounding the central pincushion of cherry-red flowers. The flower stems and young leaves are also flushed with a burgundy glow. A vigorous variety which produces nice large flowers, although flower size in Astrantia is closely linked to nutrition, so feed well and divide from time to time. What's in a name... Gill Richardson gardened in Lincolnshire and has been an avid collector and grower of a wide range of Astrantias since she first fell in love with Ruby Wedding at an RHS Show at Vincent Square in London. In the 1990's she gave seeds to John Metcalf, a Norfolk nurseryman who selected the best dark form from the resulting seedlings. He named it in honour of Gill and it was launched at Chelsea in 2004.

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    Astrantia in the Garden

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  • Epimedium fargesii ‘Pink Constellation’ Epimedium fargesii ‘Pink Constellation’

    Potsize - 1L

    (OG 93023) This is a selected form, collected by Mikinori Ogisu and later given a cultivar name. It is distinguished by the colouration of the flowers, being pink on the inner sepals and purple in the petals. In other respects like the species, so I have copied that description hereafter. An elegant plant with strong flowering stems bearing a pair of tri-foliate beautiful bronzy leaflets set amongst an elegant spray of pendulous white and violet deeply reflexed flowers reminiscent of a stellar pelargonium or miniature shuttlecock. Individual flowers are 3 - 3.5cm wide with the outer sepals creating a delicate starry effect. The inner petals are purple violet and arch back into the sepals whilst the stamens protrude, creating an ochre coloured 'beak'. The flower stems can be between 20-50cm high. The leaves are in 3 leaflets, long, arrow-shaped and a beautiful pinky bronze when young, remaining irregularly red blotched when older. They are softly pink and serrated, thick textured and persist well into winter. The fact that the leaf edges undulate with alternate paler green spines pointing either up or down creates real texture and interest. Subgenus Epimedium, Section i, D Series - Brachycerae

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