Aquilega 'Koralle'

Aquilega ‘Koralle’

  • Aquilegia ‘Koralle’ An old cottage garden favourite and a good cut flower. Abundant display in late spring of long spurred red and yellow flowers over fine blue-green foliage. 80cm. Full sun. Medium height variety. A seed grown strain that might display some variation in colour and form. HARMFUL IF EATEN
Aquilega caerulea -hybrid 'Heavenly Blue' ('Sky Blue' , 'Blue Dream')

Aquilegia caerulea -hybrid ‘Heavenly Blue’ (‘Sky Blue’ , ‘Blue Dream’)

  • Aquilegia ‘Heavenly Blue’ (‘Sky Blue’, ‘Blue Dream’). A long spurred aquilega whose flowers are a rich cobalt blue with contrasting white corolla.  A cottage garden favorite & an excellent and unusual cut flower. May to June. 85cm. A Medium height variety. allow some air around the crown. HARMFUL IF EATEN
Aquilega caerulea-hybrid 'Rose Queen'

Aquilegia caerulea-hybrid ‘Rose Queen’

  • Aquilegia ‘Rose Queen’. A long spurred aquilega whose flowers are a rose-madder pink with contrasting white corolla. A shorter variety with highly branched flowering stems.  A cottage garden favourite and an excellent and unusual cut flower. May to June. up to 80cm. This is a seed grown strain and may show some variation in form and colour. HARMFUL IF EATEN
Aquilega 'White Star'

Aquilegia ‘White Star’

  • Aquilegia ‘White Star’ (Star Series) ( syn. ‘Kristal’, ‘Crystal Star’). A long spurred aquilegia with pure white flowers. A cottage garden favourite and an excellent and unusual cut flower. The flowers posses such a clean crisp bright whiteness that is only matched by flowers such as Geranium sylvarticum ‘Album’ – its a wonder they haven’t found their way onto Persil adverts. May to June. 85cm. Sun. HARMFUL IF EATEN
Aquilega caerulea -hybrid 'Yellow Star'

Aquilegia caerulea -hybrid ‘Yellow Star’

  • Aquilegia ‘Yellow Star’ (Star Series). An old cottage garden favourite and an excellent cut flower. Abundant display in late spring of long spurred lemon yellow flowers over fine blue-green foliage. Do not overcrowd the crown or allow other plants to flop over the foliage. 60cm. Full sun. HARMFUL IF EATEN
Aquilegia alpina

Aquilegia alpina

  • A high alpine meadow plant from the slopes of the Swiss Alps. It has long been prized in gardens for its large blooms of vibrant violet-blue on nodding pedicels. The young leaves are flushed with a purple tinge. 50cm. May to June.

Aquilegia vulgaris 'Nivea' ('Munstead White')

Aquilegia vulgaris ‘Nivea’ (‘Munstead White’)

  • Aquilegia vulgaris ‘Nivea’ (‘Munstead White’) has large pure-white, gracefully nodding bonnets, each 4cm wide are borne on leafy stems 80cm high in great profusion. Often tipped with green on ageing, the spurs are short and slightly curled. The attractive divided foliage forms a basal clump of fresh apple-green, leafing up early in Spring to make a lovely foil for bulbs and early Primroses in the garden. They start pushing up flowering stems as early as April and go on producing asequence of blooms until early June. They are deep rooted plants which seek water well and are therefore tolerant of dry shady conditions as well as full sun. The pure white blooms really lighten up a shady spot and look wondeful with cool greens and ferns. Although ‘Munstead White’ grows true from seed collected from isolated plants, Aquilegias are highly promiscuous members of the Ranunculaceae and will take any opportunity to mix their genes with their kin producing seedlings of a wide range of colours and spur lengths.

Aquilegia vulgaris Vervaeneana Group (Woodside Group)

Aquilegia vulgaris Vervaeneana Group (Woodside Group)

  • Aquilegia vulgaris Vervaeneana Group (Woodside Group) is a lovely group of columbines that all posses leaves that are more or less mottled with yellow on the leaves. Some are entirely golden whilst others are blotched and splashed like army camouflage. The mostly golden leaved forms tend to a white flower, of typical grannies bonnet form, whilst the darker leave scan carry flowers of pink. The foliage is early to appear and they are lovely to add another tone along with the Spring bulbs or to lighten a shadier corner.

Aquilega vulgaris 'Magpie' (William Guiness)

Aquilegia vulgaris ‘Magpie’ (William Guiness)

  • Aquilegia vulgaris ‘William Guiness’ (‘Magpie’)  A recent introduction with striking flowers in bicolour white and deep purple (near black). The flowers are of traditional nodding A. vulgaris form with well flared petals and curve-tipped spurs. Would look good in a mixed cottagey border Best in light shade. 90cm    HARMFUL IF EATEN
Aquilegia vulgaris var. stellata ( A. clematidiflora )

Aquilegia vulgaris var. stellata ( A. clematidiflora )

  • A variation on and old cottage garden classic. Aquilegia vulgaris var. stellata ( A. clematidiflora ) is the root of all of those double flowered forms that you find under the ‘Barlow’ banner. It is a lovely thing, having quite flat flowers, lacking the usual Aquilegia spurs, and having more than a passing resemblance to a clematis. The stems are tall and all the pale fleshy-pink flowers look down so that you look on teh backs of the flowers. easy and well worth squeezing into a mixed bed. Will freely seed about in any well drained soil and cheer any planting in late spring with its wonderful array of pastel flesh pink blooms. Any soil that is not too wet. full sun. 60cm HARMFUL IF EATEN